Salaries for Financial Planners, Investment Advisors and Stock Brokers

The demand for advisors and brokers isn’t as dependent on bull markets and a booming economy as it might seem. In reality, it’s often when the bulls stumble and fall that the phones start ringing, and not just on private lines that planners and securities sales agents give out to current clients, either. When the euphoria falters and reality settles in is when calls start coming in on the listed numbers out there on the marquee, billboards and bus stop benches, or from leads coming from the primetime TV spots brokerages run.

According to a 2020 survey of Certified Financial Planners, 78% of CFPs® reported an increase in client calls and a 34% increase in new client inquiries within 30-days of the survey being delivered in April of that year. During this time, top client concerns addressed by CFPs® included managing volatility, protecting assets, and liquidity. No surprises there.


That was the story of 2020, which ushered in a pandemic and a financial crisis that both left a high water mark for tragedy we’ll have to look at for many years. With the economy spiraling and the stock market juking in every direction as it tried to figure out the right way to go amid unprecedented events, there were plenty of winners to be sure, but also countless ordinary Americans caught wide-eyed and desperate for guidance.


Compensation Beyond Salaries: Fee-Only, Fee-Based and Commissions-Based Planners

An Overview of the Financial Planning Industry

Salaries for Financial Planning Professionals by Position

Total Compensation for Financial Planning Professionals: Understanding Incentives and Benefits

State-by-State Guide to Financial Advisor Salaries

State-by-State Guide to Stockbroker Salaries

State-by-State Guide to Investment Advisor and Financial Analyst Salaries


Compensation Beyond Salaries: Fee-Only, Fee-Based and Commissions-Based Planners

When you’re talking about what financial planners can expect to earn, focusing exclusively on salaries can miss the mark a little. Of course, anybody hired on with an investment advisor firm and licensed as an investment advisor representative (FINRA Series 65) will be considered a payroll employee and earn a salary. The same is true of licensed brokers (FINRA Series 7) and investment advisors who are authorized to sell securities and other investment products (FINRA Series 66).

But whether you’re working strictly as an advisor – a role that involves being legally bound to the fiduciary duty to offer advice and products solely in the interest of the client… or as a broker – which is a role that has more to do with selling investment products than advising clients and that is not bound to the same fiduciary code – the typical model for compensation goes beyond base salaries to include providing services for a fee, earning a commission for selling products, or a combination of the two.

Here’s how it all works…

Fee-Only –  Since the reputation of the Wall Street crowd suffered a bit in the years following the Great Recession, financial planners have made an effort to set themselves apart from that group. The distinction has always been there, but it became more important to educate the public of that fact as a way to rebuild trust in the financial planning profession. All of a sudden the term “fiduciary” became part of the conversation, thanks largely to the marketing efforts of financial planners who began rebranding themselves and their firms as “fee-only advisors.”

Fee-only advisors sometimes charge a fee on an hourly basis, but more often it refers to a flat percentage fee for all client assets under management, usually 1 – 2%. With a fee-only model, there are no commissions earned for selling investment products, which removes any financial incentive to recommend a higher-commission product over another. While the fee-only model still allows advisors to be compensated very handsomely for their services, it gives clients the assurance that there is no conflict of interest. This gives advisors the freedom to make all recommendations strictly based on what is in the best interest of the client.

Commission-Based – Commission-based compensation is usually reserved for the sales-people of the financial services industry: stockbrokers, less often referred to by their more descriptive official title, securities sales agents. Brokers really are not by any definition considered financial planners or even investment advisors, but they do often work for the same firms, so it’s worth going into how they are compensated here, and how it relates to financial planning.

More to the point is the fact that an individual can be licensed in both roles as a securities sales agent and an investment advisor (FINRA Series 66), a common license among those that represent themselves as financial planners.

To avoid the potential for conflict between commission-based sales and the fiduciary standard that advisors are bound to, investment advisory firms are more and more often going with a strictly fee-based model when offering financial planning services, paying no commissions to the advisors that represent the firm even though those advisors are often licensed to sell securities and other investment products.

Fee and Commission – Financial planners who make some money through commissions often prefer to market their services as “fee-based,” but this almost always means that they charge a fee to clients upfront, plus earn commissions when selling investment products. Just like fee-only advisors, they would charge an hourly fee for services or a flat fee as a percentage of all assets under management, and additionally earn commissions for the securities and investment products they sell.

Although by the very definition of the investment advisor role and the covenants of the FINRA Series 66 license they hold, fee-based advisors are legally bound to the same fiduciary code that any other planner would be, they are not legally obligated to disclose how much they earn in commissions. Though it’s becoming more difficult to market yourself as a fee-based advisor as the public tends to prefer fee-only services, the fee-based model can be one of the most lucrative, providing two income streams from both fees and commissions.

An Overview of the Financial Planning Industry

The financial planning industry is broad, encompassing every aspect of strategic wealth building, from real estate to tax planning to investment to healthcare to college planning and a whole lot more. Because of this, it’s a field that also draws on different areas of expertise, opening the field up to professionals with backgrounds in accounting, taxation, finance, and insurance.

Certified financial planners, licensed investment advisers, CPAs, insurance producers, and even dually licensed advisors who are also able to sell stocks, bonds, and other securities are the licensed pros whose expertise we rely on to help us build and protect our wealth, whether it’s in the broader personal portfolio planning field or in a particular niche like tax planning or insurance.

This field is ripe with opportunities to not only earn an impressive salary but to also supplement your income with a variety of incentives such as commissions, bonuses, and stock options. In fact, for many in the industry, a base salary represents only a portion of the total compensation package and may not come into play at all if you’re among those working on a revenue-based “payout” compensation system.

With all these variables in play, it can be hard to pinpoint your earning potential as a financial planning professional. But we’ve done the legwork and have broken it all down for you so you can get a good idea of how you’ll earn and how much you can expect to earn in the financial planning industry.

Keep reading to learn more about salaries for financial planning professionals, how incentives can and do account for a significant portion of their annual compensation, and what it takes to become one of the highest earners in this field:

Salaries for Financial Planning Professionals by Position

In financial planning, expect your income to reflect your competencies, your track record, and your successes. You’ll likely begin by earning a bachelor’s degree in a finance-related area that’ll then earn you an analyst or similar position. From there your ability to rise through the ranks will be based on your accomplishments alone. A rock-hard work ethic and a commitment to client building and continued learning will get you where you want to be in the world of wealth building.

The CFB Board Center for Financial Planning, which was launched in 2016 to address a shrinking workforce due to impending retirements and an increase in consumer demand for financial planning advice, released a 2019 report, Financial Planning Career Paths, which provides a detailed picture of the jobs within the financial planning industry.

Using a career ladder rung model, the report highlighted the following jobs in financial planning, the education and training requirements of each one, and what you can expect to earn as you climb the ladder:

Rung 1: Analyst

  • Total compensation: $47,000 – $62,000, with a median of $55,000
  • Compensation type: Salaries and incentives
  • Experience: little to none
  • Education: Most firms require analysts with a bachelor’s degree in an area related to finance or economics
  • Professional certifications/designations: Most firms require analysts to hold the CFP® certification, although they may not be able to use the designation until they meet specific experience requirements.

Analysts are compensated primarily through salaries, with incentives accounting for just 9% of their median total compensation. They may earn firm incentives (company-wide incentive pools based on profitability or revenue) or individual incentives (based on individual incentive targets).

Rung 2: Associate Advisor

  • Total compensation: $59,000 – $75,000, with a median of $68,000
  • Compensation type: Salaries and incentives
  • Experience: Average about 5 years of experience
  • Education: Nearly all hold bachelor’s degrees
  • Professional certifications/designations: Some hold professional designations (30% hold the CFP®certification, 7% hold the CPA, and 3% hold the CFA)

Rung 3: Service Advisor

  • Total compensation: $75,000 – $122,000, with a median of $97,000
  • Compensation type: Salaries and incentives
  • Experience: Average about 10 years of experience
  • Education: Bachelor’s degrees and the Series 65 securities license
  • Professional certifications/designations: About 60% hold the CFP® certification, 8% have a CPA, and 6% hold a CFA.

While experience is always a consideration, financial planning knowledge and client service skills remain the most important factors for promotion from associate advisor to service advisor.

Rung 4: Lead Advisor/Managing Director

  • Total compensation: $125,000 – $262,000, with a median of $163,000; incentives average $15,000 – $58,000
  • Compensation type: Salary and incentives or paid a percentage of the firm’s revenue (revenue-based)
  • Experience: An average of 17 years of experience
  • Education: Most have bachelor’s degrees; must pass the Series 65 – Uniform Investment Adviser Law Exam
  • Professional certifications/designations: Many hold advanced certifications and designations—61% hold the CFP® certification and 9% hold the CFA charter.

While experience is important, promotion to this level usually requires candidates who have displayed the ability to service clients and have a high level of expertise in business development. Professional assessment in this position is based on the ability to service and retain existing clients and attract new clients.

Rung 5: Principal/Partner

  • Total compensation: $185,000 – $316,000, with a median of $247,000
  • Compensation type: Salary and incentives or revenue-based; incentives average $20,000 – $90,000
  • Experience: An average of 22 years of experience as a financial professional; newly promoted principals/partners have about nine years of experience
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree is standard, although many also hold MBAs; must pass the Series 65 – Uniform Investment Advisor Law Exam
  • Professional certifications/designations: 64% hold the CFP® designation; 13% are CPAs, and 15% hold the CFA charter

Most firms look for principal/partners who generate a median of $100,000 or more in revenue and achieve a client retention rate of more than 90%.

Revenue-based compensation for principal/partners at regional broker-dealers equals between 40% – 55% and between 45% – 48% at traditional national firms of the revenue for which they are responsible. Principal/partners may also receive a portion of the revenue generated by other advisors on their team (referred to splitting cases and overrides).

Total Compensation for Financial Planning Professionals: Understanding Incentives and Benefits

Compensation in the world of financial planning is highly variable and diverse, and you’ll find differences in compensation models from one firm to the next and certainly in organizations of different sizes and different business models.

The foundation of compensation in nearly every model is salary – base pay. But the second part of the overall compensation picture – incentives – is nearly as important. Incentives in financial planning come into the picture when financial pros meet their revenue goals and their job responsibilities. Often designed as an annual bonus system, incentives are based on either individual or team success.

In independent wealth management firms and retail financial planning organizations, salaries remain the primary method of compensation for lower- to mid-level professionals (advisors, associate advisors, and senior advisors). Many firms use the following resources as guidance for salary-based benchmarks:

  • InvestmentNews Adviser Compensation & Staffing Study, sponsored by Pershing LLC
  • Charles Schwab’s RIA Benchmarking Study
  • Fidelity RIA Benchmarking Study
  • FPA’s Trends in Adviser Compensation and Benefits
  • FA Insight Study of Advisory Firms: People and Pay

However, not surprisingly, incentives make up a larger portion of the total compensation picture among higher-ranking financial professionals. The CFB Board Center for Financial Planning reports the median incentives for the following financial professionals based on their median total compensation:

  • Support advisor: 9%
  • Associate advisor: 9%
  • Service advisor: 12%
  • Lead advisor/managing director: 17%
  • Principal/partner: 22%

Incentives may be designed in a number of ways:

  • Individual-Based Incentives: Based on the individual achievement of the advisor; may be measured by revenue managed, assets managed, client retention, and more and is often determined as a percentage of the advisor’s salary
  • Firm-Based Incentives: Based on the success of the firm to reach specific profit or revenue goals; paid out in a pool that is split based on an advisor’s salary, individual performance, or position.
  • Team-Based Incentives: Based on the team reaching revenues above a specified target; usually found in very large firms
  • Business Development Incentives: Usually reserved for salary-based systems; based on the number of new clients brought to the firm and are paid out as a percentage of the new revenue generation from those clients.

More than half of all CFPs® earn the bulk of their income through a ‘payout’ compensation system, where they earn a percentage of the generated revenue. This type of compensation is most popular in the largest organizations, as well as with regional broker-dealers and independent contractor broker-dealers.

According to the CFB Board Center for Financial Planning, average payouts based on the percentages of revenue among the four largest practice-building operations were:

  • $500,000: 41% payout
  • $750,000: 42% payout
  • $1,000,000: 44% payout
  • $2,000,000: 46% payout
  • $5,000,000: 50% payout

Benefits are also an important part of a financial advisor’s compensation package, with healthcare and retirement coming out on top most of the time.

The Ensemble Practice, a firm that provides practice management programs and consulting services, revealed in their 2018 survey of advisory organizations that 96% of all advisory firms offer healthcare benefits to their employees. Of these, 80% pay their employees’ healthcare premiums and 30% pay family premiums.

The survey also found that 98% of firms offer retirement benefits that come with a variety of features, including profit-sharing.

Firms provide, on average, between 13-19 vacation days and 20-25 PTO days. Other benefits included discretionary marketing budgets and education reimbursement, often toward obtaining a designation like the CFP® or CFA.

State-by-State Guide to Financial Advisor Salaries

According to May 2019 statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), personal financial advisors earned an average of $119,290. The top 25% earned $154,480 while the top 10% in this field earned more than $208,000.

The top-paying states for personal financial advisors during this time were:

  • New York: $166,790
  • Washington D.C.: $150,310
  • Illinois: $142,440
  • Connecticut: $137,440
  • Massachusetts: $137,050

The following list details salaries by state (50th and 90th percentiles) for personal financial advisors, according to May 2019 BLS statistics:

  • Alabama: $81,560 – >$208,000 (approximately 1,950 personal financial advisors)
  • Alaska: $71,150 – $176,420 (approximately 110 personal financial advisors)
  • Arizona: $74,420 – $141,520 (approximately 4,050 personal financial advisors)
  • Arkansas: $57,980 – >$208,000 (approximately 910 personal financial advisors)
  • California: $83,680 – >$208,000 (approximately 25,910 personal financial advisors)
  • Colorado: $90,320 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,890 personal financial advisors)
  • Connecticut: $99,540 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,250 personal financial advisors)
  • District of Columbia: $123,660 – >$208,000 (approximately 810 personal financial advisors)
  • Florida: $85,160 – >$208,000 (approximately 15,830 personal financial advisors)
  • Georgia: $82,730 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,950 personal financial advisors)
  • Hawaii: $62,470 – $143,970 (approximately 640 personal financial advisors)
  • Idaho: $72,180 – >$208,000 (approximately 920 personal financial advisors)
  • Illinois: $101,210 – >$208,000 (approximately 7,800 personal financial advisors)
  • Indiana: $93,070 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,090 personal financial advisors)
  • Iowa: $66,470 – $178,660 (approximately 1,620 personal financial advisors)
  • Kansas: $76,010 – >$208,000 (approximately 2,060 personal financial advisors)
  • Kentucky: $73,590 – $199,640 (approximately 1,800 personal financial advisors)
  • Louisiana: $78,100 – $186,240 (approximately 1,270 personal financial advisors)
  • Maine: $106,360 – >$208,000 (approximately 520 personal financial advisors)
  • Maryland: $79,660 – $201,400 (approximately 4,330 personal financial advisors)
  • Massachusetts: $110,410 – >$208,000 (approximately 7,960 personal financial advisors)
  • Michigan: $74,260 – >$208,000 (approximately 5,320 personal financial advisors)
  • Minnesota: $78,870 – >$208,000 (approximately 3,900 personal financial advisors)
  • Mississippi: $49,460 – $206,250 (approximately 700 personal financial advisors)
  • Missouri: $63,890 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,440 personal financial advisors)
  • Nebraska: $69,340 – >$206,530 (approximately 1,350 personal financial advisors)
  • Nevada: $70,230 – $165,560 (approximately 990 personal financial advisors)
  • New Hampshire: $67,650 – >$208,000 (approximately 1,060 personal financial advisors)
  • New Jersey: $102,770 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,480 personal financial advisors)
  • New Mexico: $82,070 – >$208,000 (approximately 310 personal financial advisors)
  • New York: $141,990 – >$208,000 (approximately 26,150 personal financial advisors)
  • North Carolina: $96,370 – >$208,000 (approximately 7,690 personal financial advisors)
  • North Dakota: $67,280 – $158,000 (approximately 370 personal financial advisors)
  • Ohio: $73,650 – >$208,000 (approximately 7,040 personal financial advisors)
  • Oklahoma: $57,780 – $199,770 (approximately 1,270 personal financial advisors)
  • Oregon: $82,720 – >$208,000 (approximately 2,090 personal financial advisors)
  • Pennsylvania: $75,280 – >$208,000 (approximately 9,260 personal financial advisors)
  • Rhode Island: $91,480 – $200,230
  • South Carolina: $60,800 – $181,620 (approximately 1,930 personal financial advisors)
  • Tennessee: $61,210 – $171,390 (approximately 2,700 personal financial advisors)
  • Texas: $77,620 – $199,450 (approximately 12,800 personal financial advisors)
  • Utah: $70,510 – >$208,000 (approximately 2,510 personal financial advisors)
  • Vermont: $90,060 – >$208,000 (approximately 360 personal financial advisors)
  • Virginia: $91,330 – >$208,000 (approximately 4,500 personal financial advisors)
  • Washington: $98,350 – >$208,000 (approximately 3,820 personal financial advisors)
  • West Virginia: $62,710 – >$208,000 (approximately 410 personal financial advisors)
  • Wisconsin: $86,650 – $204,440 (approximately 5,320 personal financial advisors)
  • Wyoming: $77,820 – >$208,000 (approximately 320 personal financial advisors)

State-by-State Guide to Stockbroker Salaries

According to BLS stats, stockbrokers (securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents) earned an average salary of $93,090, as of May 2019. The top 25% earned an average of $112,770, while the top 10% earned more than $204,180 during this time.

The top-paying states (according to annual, mean wage) for stock brokers included:

  • New York: $153,800
  • Connecticut: $121,020
  • Massachusetts: $112,720
  • Minnesota: $109,130
  • Kansas: $103,480

Learn more about what brokers are earning in your state at the 50th and 90th percentiles, according to May 2019 BLS statistics:

  • Alabama: $49,370 – $136,010 (approximately 2,640 stock brokers)
  • Alaska: $56,380 – $133,120 (approximately 200 stock brokers)
  • Arizona: $46,620 – $105,170 (approximately 9,850 stock brokers)
  • Arkansas: $49,800 – $134,580 (approximately 1,610 stock brokers)
  • California: $56,140 – $154,320 (approximately 57,210 stock brokers)
  • Colorado: $52,730 – $125,130 (approximately 11,730 stock brokers)
  • Connecticut: $79,340 – >$208,000 (approximately 6,210 stock brokers)
  • Delaware: $85,820 – $156,800 (approximately 1,960 stock brokers)
  • District of Columbia: $69,610 – >$208,000 (approximately 1,470 stock brokers)
  • Florida: $55,510 – $163,440 (approximately 30,060 stock brokers)
  • Georgia: $52,560 – $162,490 (approximately 10,440 stock brokers)
  • Hawaii: $ 52,830 – $125,280 (approximately 810 stock brokers)
  • Idaho: $40,730 – $97,840 (approximately 1,350 stock brokers)
  • Illinois: $64,420 – $172,150 (approximately 22,550 stock brokers)
  • Indiana: $58,5680 – $194,680 (approximately 5,280 stock brokers)
  • Iowa: $49,710 – $119,900 (approximately 2,350 stock brokers)
  • Kansas: $69,300 – >$208,000 (approximately 2,540 stock brokers)
  • Kentucky: $56,550 – $173,390 (approximately 3,100 stock brokers)
  • Louisiana: $51,190 – >$208,000 (approximately 2,750 stock brokers)
  • Maine: $53,130 – $155,910 (approximately 840 stock brokers)
  • Maryland: $57,370 – $191,190 (approximately 5,590 stock brokers)
  • Massachusetts: $69,130 – >$208,000 (approximately 11,220 stock brokers)
  • Michigan: $48,850 – $146,280 (approximately 9,010 stock brokers)
  • Minnesota: $84,760 – >$208,000 (approximately 9,240 stock brokers)
  • Mississippi: $41,070 – $147,810 (approximately 870 stock brokers)
  • Missouri: $65,610 – $153,070 (approximately 9,920 stock brokers)
  • Montana: $58,490 – >$208,000 (approximately 530 stock brokers)
  • Nebraska: $58,080 – $154,750 (approximately 2,400 stock brokers)
  • Nevada: $47,880 – $130,350 (approximately 2,520 stock brokers)
  • New Hampshire: $66,910 – $193,750 (approximately 1,240 stock brokers)
  • New Jersey: $64,740 – $194,800 (approximately 16,650 stock brokers)
  • New Mexico: $44,740 – $106,500 (approximately 1,150 stock brokers)
  • New York: $131,070 – >$208,000 (approximately 67,120 stock brokers)
  • North Carolina: $61,780 – $168,460 (approximately 12,730 stock brokers)
  • North Dakota: $62,450 – >$208,000 (approximately 580 stock brokers)
  • Ohio: $54,530 – $128,710 (approximately 15,120 stock brokers)
  • Oklahoma: $56,110 – $155,540 (approximately 1,660 stock brokers)
  • Oregon: $48,860 – $121,820 (approximately 3,990 stock brokers)
  • Pennsylvania: $58,940 – $159,660 (approximately 17,050 stock brokers)
  • Rhode Island: $75,770 – $163,150 (approximately 1,780 stock brokers)
  • South Carolina: $48,330 – $133,580 (approximately 3,460 stock brokers)
  • South Dakota: $61,740 – $191,750 (approximately 570 stock brokers)
  • Tennessee: $54,810 – $171,360 (approximately 4,260 stock brokers)
  • Texas: $53,750 – $166,840 (approximately 39,630 stock brokers)
  • Utah: $56,010 – $143,380 (approximately 3,410 stock brokers)
  • Vermont: $59,830 – $127,740 (approximately 630 stock brokers)
  • Virginia: $62,140 – $155,420 (approximately 8,430 stock brokers)
  • Washington: $60,070 – $142,780 (approximately 7,110 stock brokers)
  • West Virginia: $49,860 – $136,110 (approximately 590 stock brokers)
  • Wisconsin: $56,510 – 124,940 (approximately 4,220 stock brokers)
  • Wyoming: $46,280 – $99,390 (approximately 230 stock brokers)

State-by-State Guide to Investment Advisor and Financial Analyst Salaries

Investment advisors, categorized by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as financial analysts (sharing the category with financial risk specialists, and financial specialists) earned an average base salary of $124,810 working in securities, commodity contracts and other investments, according to May 2019 BLS stats. The top 10% earned $156,150 or more that year.

During this time, the top-paying states for financial analysts were:

  • New York: $132,290
  • Washington D.C.: $106,490
  • Connecticut: $103,250
  • Massachusetts: $102,610
  • Colorado: $112,000
  • Alaska: $101,600
  • California: $98,850

Learn more about what financial analysts in your state are earning at the 50th and 90th percentiles:

  • Alabama: $79,610 – $133,920 (approximately 2,110 financial analysts)
  • Alaska: $81,880 – $181,340 (approximately 580 financial analysts)
  • Arizona: $73,450 – $124,110 (approximately 7,550 financial analysts)
  • Arkansas: $55,010 – $110,350 (approximately 1,900 financial analysts)
  • California: $87,850 – $160,840 (approximately 58,810 financial analysts)
  • Colorado: $82,420 – $158,950 (approximately 7,940 financial analysts)
  • Connecticut: $90,470 – $161,230 (approximately 7,410 financial analysts)
  • Delaware: $77,230 – $154,340 (approximately 3,480 financial analysts)
  • District of Columbia: $99,160 – $163,350 (approximately 7,360 financial analysts)
  • Florida: $64,240 – $118,510 (approximately 22,190 financial analysts)
  • Georgia: $75,290 – $142,260 (approximately 14,150 financial analysts)
  • Hawaii: $77,810 – $190,420 (approximately 1,220 financial analysts)
  • Idaho: $69,540 – $115,940 (approximately 920 financial analysts)
  • Illinois: $81,650 – $142,220 (approximately 20,510 financial analysts)
  • Indiana: $70,030 – $105,700 (approximately 5,470 financial analysts)
  • Iowa: $71,980 – $121,560 (approximately 4,160 financial analysts)
  • Kansas: $66,000 – $121,600 (approximately 2,780 financial analysts)
  • Kentucky: $62,560 – $102,520 (approximately 3,290 financial analysts)
  • Louisiana: $60,710 – $101,890 (approximately 3,020 financial analysts)
  • Maine: $67,000 – $100,870 (approximately 1,140 financial analysts)
  • Maryland: $80,300 – $133,300 (approximately 11,250 financial analysts)
  • Massachusetts: $88,030 – $162,320 (approximately 18,130 financial analysts)
  • Michigan: $74,260 – $125,980 (approximately 9,580 financial analysts)
  • Minnesota: $82,930 – $136,660 (approximately 9,460 financial analysts)
  • Mississippi: $63,590 – $101,200 (approximately 850 financial analysts)
  • Missouri: $78,580 – $130,890 (approximately 7,290 financial analysts)
  • Montana: $68,140 – $112,350 (approximately 500 financial analysts)
  • Nebraska: $70,880 – $115,070 (approximately 1,690 financial analysts)
  • Nevada: $71,480 – $115,120 (approximately 1,630 financial analysts)
  • New Hampshire: $78,950 – $125,330 (approximately 990 financial analysts)
  • New Jersey: $87,250 – $161,580 (approximately 16,870 financial analysts)
  • New Mexico: $71,020 – $154,810 (approximately 1,870 financial analysts)
  • New York: $106,970 – >$208,000 (approximately 57,980 financial analysts)
  • North Carolina: $80,790 – $132,830 (approximately 13,070 financial analysts)
  • North Dakota: $77,010 – $149,330 (approximately 480 financial analysts)
  • Ohio: $74,340 – $121,790 (approximately 15,670 financial analysts)
  • Oklahoma: $67,950 – $108,450 (approximately 2,460 financial analysts)
  • Oregon: $79,030 – $125,740 (approximately 4,460 financial analysts)
  • Pennsylvania: $78,630 – $143,310 (approximately 17,480 financial analysts)
  • Rhode Island: $83,510 – $129,360 (approximately 1,870 financial analysts)
  • South Carolina: $68,810 – $116,920 (approximately 2,870 financial analysts)
  • South Dakota: $65,580 – $101,070 (approximately 660 financial analysts)
  • Tennessee: $60,910 – $107,690 (approximately 8,680 financial analysts)
  • Texas: $78,130 – $138,850 (approximately 40,460 financial analysts)
  • Utah: $67,000 – $108,250 (approximately 5,150 financial analysts)
  • Vermont: $73,340 – $116,720 (approximately 360 financial analysts)
  • Virginia: $90,560 – $151,640 (approximately 14,020 financial analysts)
  • Washington: $82,010 – $148,920 (approximately 9,500 financial analysts)
  • West Virginia: $67,910 – $104,250 (approximately 1,320 financial analysts)
  • Wisconsin: $70,340 – $118,750 (approximately 5,860 financial analysts)
  • Wyoming: $62,660 – >$208,000 (approximately 180 financial analysts)

 

Salary and employment data compiled by the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics in May of 2019. Figures represent accumulated data for all employment sectors in which personal financial advisors work. BLS salary data represents average and median earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries. 

Salary and employment data compiled by the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics in May of 2019. Figures represent accumulated data for all employment sectors in which Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents work. BLS salary data represents average and median earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries. 

Salary and employment data compiled by the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics in May of 2019. Figures represent accumulated data for all employment sectors in which financial analysts work. BLS salary data represents average and median earnings for the occupations listed and includes workers at all levels of education and experience. This data does not represent starting salaries. 

All salary and employment data accessed August 2020.